A Simple Method for Constructing Artificial Promoters Activated in Response to Ultrasound Stimulation.

Author: Ogawa R1, Kagiya G2, Watanabe A3, Morii A3,4, Cui ZG5, Kondo T6
Author Information:
1Department of Radiological Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama, 930-0194, Japan. ogawa@med.u-toyama.ac.jp.
2School of Allied Health Sciences, Kitasato University, Sagamihara, Japan.
3Department of Urology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, Toyama, Japan.
4Urology Department, Kurobe Municipal Hospital, Kurobe, Japan.
5Public Health, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, Toyama, Japan.
6Department of Radiological Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama, 930-0194, Japan.
Conference/Journal: Methods Mol Biol.
Date published: 2017
Other: Volume ID: 1651 , Pages: 187-203 , Special Notes: doi: 10.1007/978-1-4939-7223-4_14. , Word Count: 151


It has been pointed out that ultrasound could be used as a controller for bioprocesses including gene expression since its energy can noninvasively reach deep in the body. Gene expression may be timely and spatially controlled by ultrasound, thus providing necessary bioactive proteins for the targeted tissue in a timely fashion. Although there are many processes involved in gene expression control, one of the most important processes is transcription, and the promoter plays an essential role in it. There are several promoters known to be activated in response to ultrasound irradiation . However, in our opinion, an artificial promoter is more suitable for clinical use. We herein describe simple methods to construct promoters that are responsive to ultrasound irradiation by randomly combining cis-elements (transcription factor binding motifs) and thereby improve its reactivity to ultrasound irradiation .

KEYWORDS: Cis-element; Directed evolution; Error-prone PCR; Oxidative stress; TATA box; Ultrasound

PMID: 28801908 DOI: 10.1007/978-1-4939-7223-4_14

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